Tuesday, 14 February 2012

What is the History of the Waistcoat? part 2 (Weird & Wonderful)

Below are some great looks and styles of waistcoat for you to see. Hopefully they will inspire you to be more daring in your image and try something a little off the beaten track. 

The dreadlocked man in this photo has a great look going. The streaks of grey and white in his beard match perfectly the grey fabric of his 3 piece tweed. It's a great tweed affiar here. Slightly tight for my classical tastes but love the confidence of his dress. Would have gone for a flat cap instead the straw hat but everyone's different. 

The man on the left seems such a gent that you don't even need the red London telephone box in the back ground to guess which city he is in. Looks like a marine blue felt waistcoat underneath a very dashing navy check double breasted jacket. And the trilby is a nice touch. If you saw this guy walking down the street you couldn't help but notice. This is such a subtle look that the accessories are the actual draw whilst the main items sit as a background instead of the focus. Very well put together.

 
This chap just looks the part. This  is much more a weekend or country look but with aristocracy in its blood. The lapel is a shawl lapel which has not corners or points like a notch or peak. The material is again a tweed in a slight mustard colour. Everything is done to perfection even the lovely thought to the tie pin.
Wanted to point out that his shirt collar is wonderful in size and shape. Perfectly frames his head as an over wide one would make him look clowny and a short narrow one would make his head look like a lollipop. 
Note the watch chain. Very classy touch and a man after my own heart. Also note the tightness of the waistcoat. Not uncomfortable but is assisting flattening the belly and love handles to something more flattering. 
Also the fit is tailored but not skin tight around the jacket and the trousers. The trousers have at least one pleat and think I can see two which adds more room around the bum and legs. 
And the final flourish of adding a plain handkerchief that matches the ties brings the whole look together. But remember, this is the power of a waistcoat. To bring an outfit all together and add some real class. Cause without it this would be a great but I think slightly yellow suit. With it the look becomes wonderfully eccentric. 

Below is another lapelled waistcoat. Done in a notch style it even has a buttonhole cut which is unusual but I think is a nice touch as it says this is a garment by itself rather than a missing part of a 3 piece suit. It is hard to see but think the lower pockets have a flap over them hitch again is an out of the norm extra. Clearly a tweed with a subtle check or plaid as a pattern. Look great as a casual piece which I have used to style quite a few client looks for spring and summer seasons.